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How Can Life be Handled With an Aging Parent and Young Kids?

It’s never easy to watch our parents get older and lose the capabilities to do certain tasks independently. It’s even harder for those whose parents have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia while raising a young family of your own simultaneously. Not only does this diagnosis guarantee a parent’s eventual loss of skills and independence, but it could also mean a loss of personality traits and characteristics of the person who raised them.

 

Below is a letter I think unfortunately many of us can relate too. Written by a member of the Sandwich Generation to sociologist and coach Christine Carter about her struggles with feeling overwhelmed, sad, and stuck.

“My mom was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s two years ago, just before I got pregnant with my second daughter. I was fortunate to have a stellar short-term therapist available through a pregnancy program at work to help me come to grips with my mom’s...

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How Old Should You Be Before You Get Powers of Attorney?

 

How old should you be before you get powers of attorney? In this video, I was inspired right after leaving a court hearing to answer this VERY important question about why it may not be when, or why, you think.

Use The Amazing Legal Tools Available To Protect Yourself, and Those You Love. 

How?  Contact us Today: (248)278-1511

Prefer to read this information? Below is the video transcript.

So how old should you be before you have a power of attorney?

Hi, I'm Nicole Wipp, the founder and lead attorney of the Family and Aging Law Center.

I'm sitting here in my car after I literally just got out of court in that building right there today, and I got so inspired to make this video because of what happened in court today.

You know, the reason that I was there is because I was representing a woman that is younger than me. She has a husband that got in a terrible car accident, and now is completely unable to make any decisions for himself related to finances and related...

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Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE)

With PACE, teams of health care professionals focus on the unique needs and circumstances of participants, and their families, to make sure participants receive the coordinated care they need.

 

The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) is a program that helps seniors meet their health care needs at home & in their community as an alternative to a nursing home or other care facility.

SERVICES

With PACE, an individualized plan of care is developed and maintained by a team of health care and service professionals to meet specific needs. These services include all Medicare and Medicaid-covered services and may include, but are not limited to:

  • Primary and Specialist Care (including Women's Health)
  • Medications
  • Medical Transportation
  • Therapy (Occupational, Physical, Speech)
  • Recreational Day Center Activities
  • Home Care
  • Hospital & Emergency Services
  • Dental
  • Vision
  • Hearing
  • Foot Care
  • Nursing Home
  • End of Life Supportive Care

In Michigan, the areas serviced by PACE...

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Irrevocable Pure Grantor Trusts (Part 2)

Irrevocable Pure Grantor Trusts With David Zumpano (Part 2)

Irrevocable trusts, traditionally, are estate tax planning devices. Very few Americans need estate tax planning, however – less than 2%. Why, then, would you want an irrevocable trust?

This two part series, including part one, focuses on a new type of irrevocable trust known as the irrevocable pure grantor trust.

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Irrevocable pure grantor trusts are mainly used to protect assets from creditors and predators, and can be an excellent pre-planning tool for elder law attorneys and their clients.  Understanding what they are, and how they differ, from traditional irrevocable trusts is essential.

In this episode, David Zumpano, a nationally recognized expert on asset protection and elder law planning (also a CPA & attorney) discusses this irrevocable trust, who it is for, and why you may want one.

Learn how this type of trust is one of the best ways to truly keep your money “safe.”

...

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Irrevocable Pure Grantor Trusts

Irrevocable Pure Grantor Trusts With David Zumpano (Part 1)

What is an irrevocable pure grantor trust, and why would someone want one? In this episode, David Zumpano, a nationally recognized expert on asset protection, estate planning & elder law, discusses with our attorney Nicole Wipp, this little known (although widely used) trust – what it is, why we use it, and who it is for.

In Part One You Will Learn:

  • about the goal of helping a loved one to protect their autonomy
  • why people end up in nursing homes (how failing to plan makes this more likely)
  • why retirement isn’t necessarily what you think it is
  • why we want to engage in an asset protection strategy for financial security in our later years
  • what is an irrevocable pure grantor trust, and how it differs from tax trusts and revocable living trusts
  • the history of trusts and what they were traditionally used for (tax trusts – the “traditional” irrevocable trust – no access, no control, no...
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What Are the Rules for Medicaid Qualification (Part 5)? - 60 Months

What Are the Rules for Medicaid Qualification (Part 5)?

As in part four of our series, your Medicaid planning advisor can best help you determine how the rules apply to your specific circumstances in your specific locality. Before you get into the specifics, however, it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the general federal guidelines for Medicaid qualification that apply everywhere.

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Do I Have to Wait 60 Months?

The Asset Transfer "Box”

Many people believe that if you give your assets away, you must wait 60 months to qualify for Medicaid. This is not the case. The 60 month requirement only applies to the financial disclosure you must provide, not eligibility.

Think of it this way: When you go to apply for Medicaid, imagine you’re bringing a box with you. In that box is every financial transaction you’ve made for the previous 60 months. That is all you need to provide – if you made a transaction 61 months ago, it’s not...

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Revocable Living Trusts (Part 1) With Nicole Wipp

Revocable Living Trusts (Part 1) With Nicole Wipp

How Do Revocable Living Trusts Work?

In this episode, host Nicole Wipp discusses what a “RLT” is and the importance of “funding your trust” – a commonly missed step.

You will learn:

  • What the primary purposes of revocable living trusts are
  • What a revocable living trust does NOT do for you
  • Common misunderstandings as to how this trust works
  • What trust funding is and why it is critically important

This is Part 1 of a two-part series on Revocable Living Trusts. To listen to Part 2, click here.

 

Be a SMART PLANNER!

Contact Us Today at (248) 278-1511. We Can Help.

The information in this podcast is not intended to be, nor should it be, construed as legal advice. It is for informational purposes only. For advice, specific to your situation, consult with a qualified attorney.

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What Are the Rules for Medicaid Qualification (Part 4)? - Allowable Income

As part 3 of our series, your Medicaid planning advisor can best help you determine how the rules apply to your specific circumstances in your specific locality. Before you get into the specifics, however, it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the general federal guidelines for Medicaid qualification that apply everywhere.

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Allowable Income

How much income are you allowed under Medicaid law?

There are different answers for the “community spouse” and the individual who resides in a nursing home.

  • Nursing home residents can only keep $60 a month as a personal needs allowance – the rest of their income must go to help cover the cost of their care.
  • If the resident is married, the community spouse can keep between $1,966.25 - $2,980.50 a month (in 2015), including income from the nursing home spouse.
  • Many states permit the community spouse to retain all of their individual income without limit. In other states, the community spouse...
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What Are the Rules for Medicaid Qualification (Part 3)? - Property Liens

As in part two of our series, your Medicaid planning advisor can best help you determine how the rules apply to your specific circumstances in your specific locality. Before you get into the specifics, however, it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the general federal guidelines for Medicaid qualification that apply everywhere.

Let's Continue....

 

PROPERTY LIENS

In addition, the state can place a lien on an unmarried Medicaid recipient’s home, unless certain dependent relatives live on the premises or the state permits a “Homestead Exemption”.

Sale of the property, while the person receiving Medicaid is still living, could result in the loss of Medicaid coverage (due to excessive assets) and an obligation to use the sale proceeds to satisfy the lien that Medicaid places against the home.

There are exceptions to this rule. Satisfaction of the lien is not required if the applicant returns home prior to their death or one or more of the following...

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What Are the Rules for Medicaid Qualification (Part 2)? - Estate Recovery

What Are the Rules for Medicaid Qualification (Part 2)?

As in Part One of our series, your Medicaid planning advisor can best help you determine how the rules apply to your specific circumstances in your specific locality. Before you get into the specifics, however, it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the general federal guidelines for Medicaid qualification that apply everywhere.

Let's Continue....

ESTATE RECOVERY

What happens to a Medicaid recipient’s estate when he or she passes away? Like so much else, that depends on whether they have properly planned to protect it.

When a Medicaid recipient dies, the state may attempt to recover the benefits paid to that individual from his or her estate – that is a requirement under federal Medicaid law. However, the state cannot proceed with this recovery process if any of the following applies:

  • if the recipient’s spouse is still living
  • if the recipient has a child under age 21
  • if the recipient has a...
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